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Enjoy Your Next Deposition

Last week, I had fun. I manage my husband’s forensic psychological practice, and last week he had a deposition. He loves depositions. Really. The data he needed to review, however, was oppressive; he had performed five Fitness for Duty evaluations over 18 months on a professor not well ...

0 Comment   |   Posted in Blog May 13, 2014

LNCC and CLNC – What do these initials mean, really?

Attorneys are practical professionals. They seek a legal nurse who consistently delivers an excellent work product and sound opinions. They also recognize that certification should be an indicator of experience and expertise in a nurse. Although LNCC and CLNC are often thought of as interchangeable, even by some nurses, ...

0 Comment   |   Posted in Blog January 19, 2014

Tips for your First Consultative Report

There is no "correct" way to write a consultative report, and so much depends upon what your attorney wants. What do you think the attorney needs to see? This is just my personal style. The first thing I write is an introductory paragraph that cites the patient’s name, claimed injury, ...

0 Comment   |   Posted in Blog January 10, 2014

Writing Your First Chronology

Encarta Dictionary: English (North America) chro-nol-o-gy (noun) 1. Order of events: the order in which events occur, or their arrangement according to this order.] This simple definition is what many professionals conceptualize when they think “chronology”. If it were that simple, I could ...

0 Comment   |   Posted in Blog January 10, 2014

Biding Your Time

Recently, a nurse was sharing her angst that attorneys to whom she marketed via email were not responding to her. I have been giving this some thought because it is a situation that many new LNCs experience. Everyone finds their comfort level in ...

0 Comment   |   Posted in Blog January 10, 2014

Right Question, Wrong Answer

Attorneys have strong feelings about things that they do NOT want. I have heard many complaints from attorneys  who had a bad experience in the past. They abhor overly long chronologies that include every detail but fail to identify what ...

0 Comment   |   Posted in Blog January 10, 2014

The Mental Health Divide, Part Two

continued from October 24, 2013) November 10, 2013 More about the five axes of the DSM-IV-TR: • Axis I relates to Clinical Disorders, which include all forms of depression (severity and recurrence), anxiety and mood disorders, PTSD, schizophrenia and psychoses. Think of these as disorders that are acute or chronic, biologic or reactive, ...

0 Comment   |   Posted in Blog November 10, 2013

The Mental Health Divide, Part One

(Disclosure: I have worked fulltime for 20 years and now part time in a clinical psychological practice. As a nurse and patient advocate interfacing with physicians, nurse case managers and attorneys, dealing with insurance reimbursement was once 5% of one day a week; now it is closer to 20% of ...

0 Comment   |   Posted in Blog October 24, 2013

Your Attorney Knows this – Do You?

Regardless of which side retains you as a legal nurse consultant, you are working on issues of defense. The public is perpetually confused about the term “defense” in a lawsuit, but the distinctions are clear. Civil torts encompass personal injury in all its non-criminal forms of malpractice, negligence, product/premises liability and ...

0 Comment   |   Posted in Blog October 13, 2013

How Time-consuming is a Chronology?

How long does it take to compile a chronology from 5000 pages of medical records? It really does vary with each case. Sometimes a law firm will ask me not to produce a chronology with the goal of saving money; “just focus on xyz”. That is fine for an expert ...

0 Comment   |   Posted in Blog June 22, 2013